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Tuesday
Aug262014

Dividing Mexico

Hey, a big crack has opened up in Mexico. whether it will slow down the mass migration into the USA is another question.


Mile-Long Crack Opens in the Ground in Rural Mexico.

    --- A rather neat overhead shot.

Tuesday
Aug262014

They call it Beer?

Yuck, I opened a can of Coors by mistake, so I forced myself to drink it, Yuck.

The big three all have the same problem, they think volume, equates money.

 Whereas your local brew pub or micro brewery thinks in terms of quality, and as a side effect makes money.

 My thoughts on the big three:

  • Miller (any flavor) is just a cheap semi-Mexican beer with a dark, questionable flavor.
  • Coors (any flavor) Christ, can it be any more watered down?
  • Corona (any colour) Just disgustingly weak. I can think of better ways to get my supply of rice and/or corn.

 Over a number of years, I and my fellow brew pub buddies have converted a multitude of 'beer guzzlers' into 'Real Beer' drinkers.

Where it starts for most of these converts, is when they try the variety of flavours available at the annual organized beer tasting.

       --- Held at the Centre of the Arts, in Regina!

 

Friday
Aug222014

Medinilla magnifica

There are approximately 400 species of Medinilla, of which, only the magnifica is grown as a houseplant.

The family name of the Medinilla is Melastomataceae. Medinilla magnifica finds its origin in the mountains of the Philippines. It is an epiphyte, which is a plant that grows on other trees but does not withdraw its food from those trees as parasites do.

 Now this is really different, yep I gotta get me one of these.

When the botanists started growing Medinilla in greenhouses, it was such a great success, that now,
   --- we all can enjoy the beauty of Medinilla!

Monday
Aug182014

Mandevilla or Dipladenia

What's the difference, The Dipladenia has a fuller shape than the Mandevilla. The main difference between a Dipladenia and Mandevilla is the foliage. Dipladenia leaves are fine and pointed, deeply green and slightly glossy. They also are available with yellow flowers.

Mandevilla vine has larger leaves with a broader shape. The flowers are trumpet shaped and full, in shades of pink, white, and/or red. Both plants respond well to pinching as they grow, which forces new bushier growth. Unlike the Mandevilla, Dipladenia doesn’t send out as much upward growth and therefore doesn’t need staking.

Both of the plants attract hummingbirds and bees. The tubular flowers are a food signal to pollinators, as a supplier of nectar.

The growing habit of the Mandevilla and Dipladenia is similar, except the Mandevilla require a trellis. While Dipladenia only need a stake to keep the plant straight as it grows.

Both require warm temperatures for best performance. Night time temperatures for both should be,
   ---- around 13-15ᐤ C (65-70ᐤ F)!

Saturday
Aug162014

New Record

Saskatchewan’s unemployment rate is at an unprecedented low of 3.2 per cent, the lowest unemployment rate ever recorded since Statistics Canada began measuring the rate in 1976.

At this point in time, there are more than 14,000 jobs listed on the Saskjobs website.

It’s not easy and we do have to hunt. We do have to lift the stones and dig under stones to find the talent,” said Carman Gosselin, area manager for Manpower.

Saskatchewan’s labour shortage is longstanding. If you can't find a job here, let's be honest,
   ---- you really don't want to work!

Friday
Aug152014

Big River

Hey, I was planting some new Chinese  Weeping Willows, and this darn tune just kept running though my head.

It's called 'Big River' sung by the one and only Johnny Cash.

And it has the line below, that I keep repeating,

   --- "I taught the weeping willow how to cry!"